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French

Aug 092016
 
Roasted Red Pepper Fougasse

Roasted Red Pepper Fougasse

I am back baking with my bread baking group after a long long time.  I couldn’t wait to share my Roasted Red Pepper Fougasse recipe and I had so much fun making this bread.  Thanks to Sue from A Palatable Pastime  , who chose the theme of peppers for us this month and is our host. We have  many peppery goodies for you this month, so be sure to check the blogs listed on this post for more inspirations and recipes.

Roasted Red Pepper Fougasse

This recipe of roasted red pepper fougasse tastes best when made with freshly roasted peppers. I like to keep them just a tad bit crunchy so that the peppers have a bite in them when eaten as part of the bread. It adds an element of texture which I quite like.

Roasted Red Pepper Fougasse

 

 

I make this particular fougasse with the starter method. So planning a little  ahead of time is important. As with all  breads, you spend more time waiting for the dough to do its thing than active prepping and baking. And since this doesn’t require a lot of  attention, I make the starter a day before when I start to make dinner. By the time I am done with dinner, the starter is ready to be made into a dough. Once the dough forms I leave it in the fridge overnight and then take it out 2 hours before I want to bake it. This allows flavors to develop overnight and gives me more control on when I want to bake the bread.

 

Roasted Red Pepper Fougasse

I love to smother my fougasse in more olive oil than should be legally allowed, but it is just so so so good with the Olive oil.  It’s like fougasse was made for olive oil.

Roasted Red Pepper Fougasse

Breads with Peppers

BreadBakers

#BreadBakers is a group of bread loving bakers who get together once a month to bake bread with a common ingredient or theme. Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on this home page.

We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient. If you are a food blogger and would like to join us, just send Stacy an email with your blog URL to foodlustpeoplelove@gmail.com.

 

Roasted Red Pepper Fougasse #BreadBakers

Roasted Red Pepper Fougasse #BreadBakers

Ingredients

    Starter
  • 3/4 cup warm water
  • 2 1/4 tsp dry yeast
  • 1 C all purpose flour
  • Dough
  • 1/4 C water
  • 1/2 C roasted red peppers, diced
  • 1/4 C olive oil + more for brushing on
  • 1 clove garlic finely chopped
  • 2 1/2 C all purpose flour
  • 2 tsp salt

Instructions

    starter
  1. combine yeast and water and mix to dissolve the yeast. Let it stand for a few minutes until frothy.
  2. In a medium bowl, add the flour and yeast mix and stir to combine. cover and set aside to double in volume.
  3. Dough
  4. Combine the starter, the liquids, garlic and peppers and add to the bowl of a stand mixer
  5. Add flour and salt and using a dough hook, knead for about 5 minutes or until the dough is smooth and builds some resistance to stretching
  6. Place in a lighlty greased bowl and cover and leave in the fridge overnight
  7. A couple of hours before making the bread, take the dough out and leave it to warm up and ferment on the counter.
  8. Preheat to 450°F.
  9. Line two baking sheets with parchment.
  10. Once the dough is double in size, punch it down and make 4 equal portions
  11. Roll each portion to an oval
  12. Transfer to prepared baking sheets.
  13. Make several incisions in each oval, cutting through dough to make it look like a leaf.
  14. Cover loosely with a moist kitchen towel and let rise in warm draft-free area until slightly puffed, about 20 minutes.
  15. Brush with a little olive oil and bake until golden on top and slightly crisp on bottom, switching sheets between racks and turning front of each sheet to back of oven halfway through baking, about 15 minutes.
  16. Transfer bread to cooling racks and eat after it has cooled down slightly.
http://dev.spiceroots.com/roasted-red-pepper-fougasse/

Apr 282015
 

 

French Onion Tart

When the theme for April’s Progressive eats was announced, I imagined myself making a Dacquoise or a Mille-feuille. Having already made the Gateau Opera a few dozen times and enjoyed the Croquembouche challenge with Jenni, I was ready to make a switch and make something else. The decadent Dacqupiose was tempting me. But then I thought, I do need to go out of my comfort zone and make something new and something that showcases the sublime beauty of regional French Cuisine.

 

French Onion Tart

I am really proud of the Tarte á l’Oignon – French Onion Tart. You may ask why. After all it is just a pie, some might say. I know. But if you asked my friend Barb @ Creative Culinary, she would tell you how utterly terrified I was of making pies. She was also amused and told me on certain occasions that I was being silly since I was someone who didn’t blink before taking on complex desserts and was terrified of a pie. So she took on the mantle of a mentor and called me over and we baked pies. And I was allowed to use her Grandma’s rolling pin too.

The good thing about pies is that they are simple. And that’s what is terrifying too. I think simple dishes should be executed flawlessly because they rely on technique more than anything else.

Today’s Tarte á l’Oignon – French Onion Tart is the Appetizer course for Progressive Eats. I hope I made my friend and teacher proud. And I am really thrilled with this. I did it!

French Onion Tart

Caramelized onions, cooked slow and long to coax their sweetness out, freshly made dough for the base, a touch of salt and pepper, a few eggs, a little cheese  and a sprig of thyme. Ingredients that you probably just have on hand. Why not give this a try? If I can do it, anyone can! Honest!

Have a taste of the French Cuisine with my Progressive Eats friends and see what they have cooked up.

 

progressive-eats-logo

Join us for the Flavors of France!

Appetizers
Salad
Soups
Main Course
Bread
Veggies/Sides
Drinks
Desserts

 

Welcome to Progressive Eats, our virtual version of a Progressive Dinner Party. This month’s theme is the Flavors of France and is hosted by Jane Bonacci who blogs at The Heritage Cook. Join us and make something unique and delicious!

If you’re unfamiliar with the concept, a progressive dinner involves going from house to house, enjoying a different course at each location. With Progressive Eats, a theme is chosen each month, members share recipes suitable for a delicious meal or party, and you can hop from blog to blog to check them out.

We have a core group of 12 bloggers, but we will always need substitutes and if there is enough interest would consider additional groups. To see our upcoming themes and how you can participate, please check out the schedule at Creative Culinary or contact Barb for more information.

 

Tarte á l’Oignon – French Onion Tart

Tarte á l’Oignon – French Onion Tart

Ingredients

    For the Tart base
  • 1 stick cold unsalted butter
  • 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons cold water
  • Filling
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 4-5 large onions, thinly sliced
  • Salt to taste
  • 2 eggs, whisked
  • 1/2 C gruyere
  • 3 Tbs whole milk
  • 2 Tbs crème fraîche
  • For Garnish
  • 3 thyme sprigs

Instructions

    Make pastry: Step1
  1. Blend together flour, butter and salt in a bowl with your fingertips or a pastry blender or pulse in a food processor.
  2. Mix until most of mixture resembles coarse meal with some small (roughly pea-size) butter chunks. Gradually add in ice water and gently stir with a fork (or pulse in processor) until incorporated.
  3. If the pastry holds together, it's ready. if it doesn't add a bit more water and work it in. Be sure to not overmix the dough.
  4. Gather dough together and flatten into a disk. Wrap in plastic wrap, chill until firm, at least 1 hour.
  5. Step 2
  6. I made three smaller tarts out of the dough, but you can simply roll it out to cover a 9 or 10 inch tart pan.
  7. Roll out the disk of dough on a floured surface with a floured rolling pin into a round to fit into your tart pan. Trim excess dough, leaving a 1/2-inch overhang, then fold overhang over pastry and press against side to reinforce edge. Lightly prick bottom with a fork and chill until firm ( about 30 minutes)
  8. Partially blind bake the tart shells for about 10 minutes ( I had three small so it took lesser time) at 400*F. You may need more time for a bigger tart shell.
  9. Tarte á l’Oignon
  10. Preheat the oven to 425ºF. In a heavy pot combine olive oil, butter, sliced onions and salt. Sautee the mixture until it starts to sizzle, then turn the heat down to a simmer, cover, and cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally until the onions are sweet and caramelized. Add in pepper to taste.
  11. Set aside to cool.
  12. Combine eggs, milk, creme fraiche with onions. Spread the onion mixture on top of the partially blind baked shells. Top with cheese and a sprig of thyme. Bake in the middle of the oven for 30 minutes or until the top is golden brown.
  13. Serve at room temperature.
http://dev.spiceroots.com/tarte-a-loignon-french-onion-tart/

May 292014
 

Pain au lait

 

I am a few days late in posting the Petit Pain au Lait – the bread of the month for the “We Knead to Bake project”. It’s been happening a lot lately. I do cook and bake a lot. I just don’t get around to posting them or writing about them. Sometimes I don’t even get around to photographing them. That is something that does happen when family is visiting and you are busy enjoying the time together and making memories. And for me memories around food are always the best kind.

Pain au Lait

For this month’s We knead to Bake, We had the Petit Pain au Lait – or simply put Mini Milk Bread. The only thing little about this tiny bread is its size. They are extremely flavorful and soft as clouds. They are nice and gold on the outside. Though the photos don’t show the rich golden color and for that I take personal responsibility on behalf of my oven. It has been acting really weird these past few weeks and I think it’s time I got its annual physical tests done. Anyhow, back to the bread on hand.

Pain au Lait

With a crisp exterior and really cloudy soft interiors, speckles of sugar on top and a sometimes a filling of your choice – these little breads though named simply are divine in taste. I think they are quite elegant in looks as well. It is a perfect little bread to savor with your coffee. In fact, the next batch I am making tomorrow will be brought to my new neighbors who just moved in a week ago. A pack of coffee and some mini bottles of jams in various flavors and a bag of the Petit Pain au Lait. It feels good to share something delicious.

 

Pain au Lait-3

Petit Pain au Lait

Petit Pain au Lait

Ingredients

  • 2/3 cup warm milk (Plus a few tea spoons more in case you need it)
  • 1 tsp instant yeast
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 2/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup bread flour
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 60gm butter, soft at room temperature
  • Extra milk for brushing
  • Demerara Sugar for topping (optional)

Instructions

  1. Put the warm milk, yeast and sugar in the bowl of your stand mixer.
  2. Using the Paddle attachment, Stir to mix.
  3. Add all the flour and the salt and mix until it looks crumbly. Switch to the dough hook, Add the butter and knead until you have a soft, smooth and elastic dough that’s not sticky.
  4. Add a little more milk (in teaspoonful at a time), if your dough is dry, until you have the required consistency of dough.
  5. Shape the dough into a ball and place it in an oiled bowl, turning it over to coat with oil. Cover loosely and set aside to rise until double in volume. (About 1.5 hours to 2 hours)
  6. Turn the dough out onto your working surface.
  7. Deflate the dough gently, and divide it into 10 equal pieces. Cover the dough pieces and let them rest for about 15- 20 minutes
  8. Roll out each piece of dough, one at a time, into a circle about 4” in diameter.
  9. Slowly roll up the circle from one end, Swiss roll/ jelly roll style into a cylinder.
  10. Pinch the seam closed neatly, and place them on a greased or parchment lined baking sheet with the seam side facing down. Cover loosely and let them rise for an hour or until almost double in size.
  11. Brush them lightly with milk and using a pair of sharp scissors, make diagonal incisions on the top of the rolls. Sprinkle the Demerara sugar on top.
  12. Bake at 400F for about 12 minutes or until they’re golden brown.

Notes

*If you don’t have bread flour, put 2/3 tsp vital wheat gluten in your 3/4 cup measure and top up with all-purpose flour. Mix well.

http://dev.spiceroots.com/petit-pain-au-lait/

Feb 242013
 

All Kinds of Croissants

The simple act of reaching out for a croissant, savoring its delicious layers, inhaling the deep aroma is a soul satisfying experience. Making a good croissant and sharing it recreates that experience and enhances it manifolds.

Flour, sugar, butter, milk, water, salt, yeast. That’s really all you need to make these fabled bites of a Viennoiserie goodness. The perfect crunch of top, the buttery layers inside and one little bite into it transports you to a place from where you don’t want to return.

Making a Croissant takes just two things – 1) Great quality ingredients  2) Love

To say that Croissants are a labor of love is to put it mildly. You wait for the dough to be just right, you check the temperature of the butter constantly, you laminate and freeze and then you keep an eagle eye on them while they are baking. And then you share them! My dears, the day you share a well made croissant with someone, it can only mean two things –

1) You love them – A LOT

2) 2) You are Enlightened and don’t worry about earthly things any more. There is no other reason you would share this with anyone.

 

Croissants from scratch is the second bread we are doing together as part of Project “We Knead to Bake”

Aparna provided us with a tried and tested recipe that really made our project easy. The detailed step by step instructions, worked like a charm. I would have liked to say that my Croissants turned out awesome the very first time, if I didn’t know for a fact that if Aparna had not taken the time and effort to make a Croissant making guideline, I would still have been looking for the perfect recipe.

 The original source of the recipe was  Jeffrey Hamelman’s classic croissant at Finecooking.com. There really isn’t anything much that I changed from Aparna’s recipe except that I had to use some extra milk to make the dough pliable, so I am taking the liberty and using her recipe in my blog post along with instructions. For a detailed understanding of how it all comes together, watch the audio tutorial on the Finecooking.com website. Also hop on over to Aparna’s blog for a detailed step by step instruction and do check  Niv’s Blog for a panfusine version that she she named Pain au Poornam. Also check out this video to get a fair idea of what you are getting yourself into.

For more Croissant posts check out  Aparna’s “We Knead to Bake “ and these croissants are also being Yeast spotted.

 

Croissants – We Knead to Bake

Serves: 15

Serving Size: 1

Croissants – We Knead to Bake

Ingredients

    For the dough
  • 4 cups all-purpose flour, and a little more for dusting/ rolling out dough
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 tbsp cold water
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 tbsp cold milk [ I had to add two more Tbs]
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 40gm soft unsalted butter
  • 1 tbsp plus scant 1/2 tsp instant yeast
  • 2 tsp salt
  • For the butter layer
  • 250 gm cold unsalted butter
  • For final egg/milk wash
  • 1/4 cup of cold milk / 1 egg for egg wash / a mixture of 1/4 C powdered milk and a little water to brush on top of Croissants before baking

Instructions

    Day 1
  1. Combine all the ingredients for the dough in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook. You can also use a food processor with the plastic blade, or do this by hand.
  2. Mix everything on low speed for 3 minutes, scraping the sides of the mixing bowl once if necessary. Then mix further on medium speed for 3 minutes. Lightly flour a 10-inch pie pan or a dinner plate. And place the ball of dough on this.
  3. Gently shape the dough into a flat ball by pressing it down before storing it in the fridge, this makes rolling out next morning easier. Lightly dust the top of the dough with flour and wrap well with plastic so it doesn’t dry out. Refrigerate overnight.
  4. Day 2
    Make the butter layer
  5. The next day, cut out 2 pieces of parchment or waxed paper into 10” squares each. Cut the cold butter into 1/2-inch-thick slabs. Place these pieces on one piece of parchment/ waxed paper so they form a 5- to 6-inch square. Cut the butter further into pieces as required to fit the square. Top with the other piece of parchment/ waxed paper.
  6. Using a rolling pin, pound the butter with light, even strokes. As the pieces begin to stick together, use more force. Pound the butter until it flattens out evenly into a square that’s approximately 7-1/2”. Trim the edges of the butter to make a neat square. Put the trimmings on top of the square and pound them in lightly with the rolling pin. Refrigerate this while you roll out the dough.
  7. Laminate the dough
  8. Unwrap and lay the dough on a lightly floured work surface. Roll it out to a 10-1/2-inch square, and brush off the excess flour. Take the butter out from the refrigerator —it should be cold but pliable. If it isn’t refrigerate it till it is. This so that when you roll out the dough with the butter in ti, neither should it be soft enough to melt, or hard enough to break. Unwrap the butter and place it on the square of dough in the centre, so that it forms a “diamond” shape on the dough.
  9. Fold one flap of dough over the butter toward you, stretching it slightly so that the point just reaches the middle of the butter square. Bring the opposite flap to the middle, slightly overlapping the previous one. Similarly repeat with the other two so that the dough forms an envelope around the butter. Lightly press the edges together to completely seal the butter inside the dough to ensure the butter doesn’t escape when you roll out the dough later.
  10. Lightly flour the top and bottom of the dough. With the rolling pin, firmly press along the dough uniformly to elongate it slightly. Now begin rolling instead of pressing, focusing on lengthening rather than widening the dough and keeping the edges straight.
  11. Roll the dough into an 8” by 24” rectangle. If the ends lose their square shape, gently reshape the corners with your hands. Brush off the excess flour. Mark the dough lightly equally into three along the long side. Using this as a guideline, pick up one short end of the dough and fold 1/3rd of it back over the dough, so that 1/3rd of the other end of dough is exposed. Now fold the 1/3rd exposed dough over the folded side. Basically, the dough is folded like 3-fold letter before it goes into an envelope (letter fold). Put the folded dough on a floured baking sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and freeze for 15 to 20 minutes to relax and chill the dough.
  12. Repeat the rolling and folding, this time rolling in the direction of the two open ends (from the shorter sides to lengthen the longer sides) until the dough is about 8” by 24”. Once again fold the dough in thirds, brushing off excess flour and turning under any rounded edges or short ends with exposed or smeared layers. Cover once again with plastic wrap and freeze for another 15 to 20 minutes.
  13. Roll and fold the dough exactly in the same way for the third time and put it baking sheet. Cover with plastic wrap, tucking the plastic under all four sides and refrigerate overnight.
  14. Day 3
    Divide the dough
  15. The next day, unwrap and lightly flour the top and bottom of the dough. Cut the dough along the longer side into halves. Cover one half with plastic wrap and refrigerate it while working on the other half.
  16. “Wake up the dough up” by pressing firmly along its length with the rolling pin. Don’t widen the dough but simply begin to lengthen it with these first strokes. Slowly roll the dough into a long and narrow strip, approximately 8” by 22”. If the dough sticks as you roll, sprinkle with flour.
  17. Once the dough is about half to two-thirds of its final length, it may start to resist rolling and even shrink back. If this happens, fold the dough in thirds, cover, and refrigerate for about 10 minutes; then unfold the dough and finish rolling.
  18. Lift the dough an inch or so off the table at its midpoint and allow it to shrink from both sides and prevent the dough from shrinking when it’s cut. Check that there’s enough excess dough on either end so that when you trim the edges to straighten them, you have a strip of dough that is 20’ inches long. Now trim the edges so they’re straight.
  19. If you’re good at “eyeballing” and cutting the dough into triangles, then forget the measuring rule, marking and cutting instructions. Otherwise, lay a measuring rule or tape measure lengthwise along the top length of the dough. With a knife, mark the top of the dough at 5-inch intervals along the length (there will be 3 marks in all). Now place the rule or tape measure along the bottom length of the dough. Make a mark 2-1/2 inches in from the end of the dough. Make marks at 5-inch intervals from this point all along the bottom of the dough. You’ll have 4 marks that fall halfway between the marks at the top.
  20. Make diagonal cuts by positioning the yardstick at the top corner and the first bottom mark. Use a pizza wheel/ pie wheel or a bench scraper and cut the dough along this line which connects each top mark to the next bottom mark and then back to the next top mark and so on. This way you will have 7 triangles and a scrap of dough at each end.
  21. Shape the croissants
  22. Now work with one piece of triangular dough at a time. Using your rolling pin, very lightly roll (do not make it thin but only stretch it slightly) the triangle to stretch it a little, until it is about 10” long. This will give your croissants height and layers. You can stretch it by hand too, but if you don’t have the practise, your stretching could be uneven.
  23. Using a sharp small knife, make a 1/2- to 3/4-inch-long notch in the centre of the short side of each triangle. The notch helps the rolled croissant curl into a crescent.
  24. Place the triangle on the work surface with the notched side closest to you. With one hand on each side of the notch, begin to roll the dough away from you, towards the pointed end.
  25. Flare your hands outward as you roll so that the notched “legs” become longer. Roll the triangle tight enough but not too tight to compress it, until you reach the “pointy” end which should be under the croissant.
  26. Now bend the two legs towards you to form a tight crescent shape and gently press the tips of the legs together (they’ll come apart while proofing but keep their crescent shape).
  27. Shape all the triangles like this into croissants and place them on a greased or parchment lined baking sheet leaving as much space between them as they will rise quite a bit.
  28. Proof the croissants
  29. Brush the croissants with milk (or a mix of water and powdered milk or an egg wash).
  30. Refrigerate the remaining milk/ egg wash for brushing the croissants again later. Place the croissants in a cool and draft-free place (the butter should not melt) for proofing/ rising for about 1 1/2 to 2 hours. They might need longer than 2 hours to proof, maybe as much as 3 hours, so make sure to let croissants take the time to proof. The croissants will be distinctly larger but not doubled in size. They’re ready if you can see the layers of dough from the side, and if you lightly shake the sheets, the croissants will wiggle.
  31. Bake the croissants
  32. Just before the croissants are fully proofed, pre-heat your oven to 400F. Brush the croissants with a second time, and place your baking sheets on the top and lower thirds of your oven.
  33. Bake them for about 15 to 20 minutes till they’re done and golden brown on top and just beginning to brown at the sides, turning once while they are baking. Cool the croissants on the baking sheets on racks.
  34. Best Served warm
http://dev.spiceroots.com/croissants-from-scratch-we-knead-to-bake2/

 Posted by on February 24, 2013 at 9:55 PM  Tagged with:
Jan 162013
 

[Breadbaking is] one of those almost hypnotic businesses, like a dance from some ancient ceremony. It leaves you filled with one of the world’s sweetest smells…there is no chiropractic treatment, no Yoga exercise, no hour of meditation in a music-throbbing chapel. that will leave you emptier of bad thoughts than this homely ceremony of making bread.”

M. F. K. Fisher, ‘The Art of Eating’

When we were young girls, a little younger than my daughter is right now, my sister and I used to take turns buying the morning bread from the neighborhood baker. It wasn’t something I looked forward to doing, because it meant leaving the cozy warm bed very early in the morning and standing in line at the “Kaandir waan” (baker’s shop), and buying “lavasa” or “Girda” for the whole family, bringing them home at top speed so they don’t get cold. However, once I got myself out the door and into the queue at the baker’s, it was not a chore anymore. I would watch with a keen interest the lines of dough balls resting underneath a moist cloth, ready to be rolled out and put on a “gaddi” ( the cloth used to safeguard the baker’s hand) and then thumped on the wall of the tandoor to be cooked for just a couple of minutes. It used to mesmerize me & the whole process was therapeutic – the rolling, baking and the wafting aroma. The evening breads were different from the morning ones and the Telvor – something that looked like a sesame bagel was my favorite.

 

Moving out of Kashmir, the kandir waan was the thing I missed a lot. No more special breads, unless you count the commercially produced things as bread. Yes, there were bakeries and they made artisan cookies and pastries and restaurants that served naan, but nothing like the bake shop back home. Nothing like biting into a just out of tandoor, hot girda slathered with butter. And the fact that the baker would always add one extra for the young customers  was more than a fair incentive. We got to munch into a just out of tandoor bread, on the way home.

If watching the baker make the bread was hypnotic, making it has been even more hypnotic. It has been therapeutic and it is one of the things that I love doing when I have the house to myself. Sometimes I bake a batch just before it’s time to pick up my daughter and the smile she gives me is PRICELESS! “you baked bread!!! which one!! Oh it’s my favorite!!” It doesn’t matter which bread I bake, they are all her favorites. It must be something she got from me 😉 and her Aunt. After all we were the bread people of the family.

 

I mostly make my fougasse with herbs de Provence and occasionally add in fresh rosemary or olives or sun dried tomatoes. It doesn’t matter what you choose to add in, as long as you have some flour water salt and oil, you have a great bread going.

I still do miss the breads I grew up with and I am hoping someday I will be able to make those breads at home, but for now, the French Fougasse with herbes de Provence comes very close to the texture of my favorite bread. I bake it often and was surprised that it was really very easy to make. I like to make the dough the night before and give it a good rest in the fridge and then take it out a few hours before final baking time.

Fougasse with Herbes de Provence

Fougasse with Herbes de Provence

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups warm water (105°F to 115°F)
  • 1.5 teaspoon dry yeast
  • 4 cups unbleached all purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons dried herbes de Provence
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 5 tablespoons olive oil

Instructions

  1. Put the warm water into the mixing bowl of your stand mixer fitted with the paddle and add the yeast.
  2. Wait about 10 minutes for the yeast to bubble up.
  3. Add 1 cup flour, Add in the herbes de Provence and the salt and add 3 tbs of the oil and put it on stir until well blended.
  4. Now add in flour half a cup at a time and knead into a sticky dough.
  5. When you have added all the flour, switch to a dough hook and knead until smooth and elastic. l. Oil a big ziplock bag with the remaining two tbs of oil bowl and put in the dough. Ensure you coat the dough with oil.
  6. Let rise in warm draft-free area until doubled for about an hour
  7. Preheat to 450°F.
  8. Line two baking sheets with parchment.
  9. Punch the dough down and urn out onto floured surface; divide into two equal halves.
  10. Roll each half to a 10 - 12 inch shaped oval.
  11. Transfer to prepared baking sheets.
  12. Make several incisions in each oval, cutting through dough to make it look like a leaf.
  13. Cover loosely with a moist kitchen towel and let rise in warm draft-free area until slightly puffed, about 20 minutes.
  14. Place the shaped bread in oven. Add in 1/2 cup of ice chips as soon as you place the bread in, to create steam.
  15. Bake breads until golden on top and slightly crisp on bottom, switching sheets between racks and turning front of each sheet to back of oven halfway through baking, about 15 minutes.
  16. Transfer bread to cooling racks and eat after it has cooled down slightly.

Notes

Minimally adapted from : Fougasse with Provencal Herbs published in Bon Appetit.

http://dev.spiceroots.com/fougasse-with-herbes-de-provence/